Hybridity in Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony (1977)

  • Noor Saady Essa Ministry of Education, Diyala Education Directorate, Iraq
Keywords: Hybridity, Euro-American culture, The Whites, Native American culture, Traditions

Abstract

Hybridity refers to the mixture of races between two communities or cultures. This paper deals with the hybridity in the Native American literature presented in Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony. The novel presents the mixture between the Native Laguna community and the Euro-American, the White one, about mixed origin's hybrid characters. It discusses that hybridity is a significant theme in Native American literature. It also shows the effects of the Euro-American culture on the Native one. Moreover, it presents the individual differences among the Natives themselves that some Natives submit to the Euro-American culture. In contrast, some others keep their Native culture of their tribe in which they are raised and learned its traditions

References

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Published
2021-04-15
How to Cite
Essa, N. S. (2021). Hybridity in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony (1977). The International Journal of Social Sciences World (TIJOSSW), 3(01), 114-122. Retrieved from https://www.growingscholar.org/journal/index.php/TIJOSSW/article/view/101
Section
Articles